Male privilege is “I have a boyfriend” being the only thing that can actually stop someone from hitting on you because they respect another male-bodied person more than they respect your rejection/lack of interest.

This amazingly puts into one sentence what I have been attempting to explain to ex-boyfriends and friends (male and female) for years, mostly unsuccessfully. The idea that a woman should only be left alone if she is “taken” or “spoken for” (terms that make my brain twitch) completely removes the level of respect that should be expected toward that woman. It completely removes the agency of the woman, her ability to speak for herself and make her own decisions regarding when and where the conversation begins or ends. It is basically a real-life example of feminist theory at work–women (along with women’s choices, desires, etc.) being considered supplemental to or secondary to men, be it the man with whom she is interacting or the man to whom she “belongs” (see the theory of Simone de Beauvoir, the story of Adam and Eve, etc.). And the worst part of the whole situation is that we’re doing this to ourselves.

Chole, first whole food real meal in a long time

Chole, first whole food real meal in a long time

Southern fried tofu

Southern fried tofu

I believe we were created to be part of the structure, not to dominate the structure. When we monocrop, use pesticides and fertilizers, we are violating a biome that God created.

This is a system created to sustain us, If we violate it, eventually we violate our own bodies. The spread of chronic disease makes me think this is already happening.

Caroline Kelly

(Source: oregonlive.com)

So while there is no easy solution to the quinoa quandary—much less a solution driven by northern consumers—the issue has generated an important debate about our global food system. At its core, it’s a debate about which strategies are most effective for creating a just and sustainable food system. And consumption-driven strategies, while part of the toolbox for effecting change, are not the only tools. Only by facing the reality that we can’t consume our way to a more just and sustainable world—and examining the full range of political options and strategies—can we start coming up with real solutions.

-“Quinoa: To Buy or Not to Buy… Is This the Right Question?”

Perhaps we need to look more to systems, trade and political power rather than to the power of the purse that accepts our main identity as consumers.

veggifitness:

In case you’ve never seen this chart.

veggifitness:

In case you’ve never seen this chart.

(Source: tofu--life)

Adapted Coleslaw from Mark Bittman!
Makes: 8 servings
Time: 30 minutes
Mark says restaurant cole slaw is shredded cabbage, mayo and lemon juice… since we were having pulled pork, I decided to add some mayo for authenticity. Mark’s version is “far more flavorful with far less fat.” So mine’s halfway.   Recipe from How to Cook Everything.

1 tablespoons Dijon mustard, or to taste
1 lemon’s worth of lemon juice 
1 small clove garlic, minced
1 tsp chili powder
1/3  cup  olive oil
1 tbsp mayo
4 cups cored and shredded Napa, Savoy, green, and/or red cabbage
1 large red or yellow bell pepper, cored, seeded, and diced or shredded
1/3 cup chopped scallion, more or less
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1. To make the dressing, whisk together the mustard and lemon juicein a small bowl, along with the garlic. Add the oil a little at a time, then mayo, whisking all the while.
2. Combine the cabbage, bell pepper, and scallion and toss with the dressing. Sprinkle with chili powder, salt and pepper and refrigerate until ready to serve.
We let it rest for an hour then served it on top of our pulled pork sandwiches, but it would be awesome on sloppy joe lentils, too.. but my new roomates are more carniverous than my old ones.
Note, Mark says: It’s best to let the slaw rest for an hour or so to allow the flavors to mellow; the cabbage will also soften a bit and exude some juice. You can let it sit longer, up to 24 hours, if you like.

Adapted Coleslaw from Mark Bittman!

Makes: 8 servings

Time: 30 minutes

Mark says restaurant cole slaw is shredded cabbage, mayo and lemon juice… since we were having pulled pork, I decided to add some mayo for authenticity. Mark’s version is “far more flavorful with far less fat.” So mine’s halfway.   Recipe from How to Cook Everything.

  • 1 tablespoons Dijon mustard, or to taste
  • 1 lemon’s worth of lemon juice 
  • 1 small clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1/3  cup  olive oil
  • 1 tbsp mayo
  • 4 cups cored and shredded Napa, Savoy, green, and/or red cabbage
  • 1 large red or yellow bell pepper, cored, seeded, and diced or shredded
  • 1/3 cup chopped scallion, more or less
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1. To make the dressing, whisk together the mustard and lemon juicein a small bowl, along with the garlic. Add the oil a little at a time, then mayo, whisking all the while.

2. Combine the cabbage, bell pepper, and scallion and toss with the dressing. Sprinkle with chili powder, salt and pepper and refrigerate until ready to serve.

We let it rest for an hour then served it on top of our pulled pork sandwiches, but it would be awesome on sloppy joe lentils, too.. but my new roomates are more carniverous than my old ones.

Note, Mark says: It’s best to let the slaw rest for an hour or so to allow the flavors to mellow; the cabbage will also soften a bit and exude some juice. You can let it sit longer, up to 24 hours, if you like.

Vegan Whole Wheat Penne Pasta with Roasted Butternut Squash and Kale, Walnut, and Rosemary Pesto Cream Sauce

My former roomate sent this in, because she liked it:

"Just a different way of incorporating the foods we love! I particularly liked the pesto! And who knew pesto was easy to make! #loveit!"

Yield 4 servings

  • 8 ounces whole wheat penne pasta
  • 1 cup Vegan Kale, Walnut, and Rosemary Pesto
  • 1/2 cup plain soy creamer
  • 2 cups 1-inch pieces of roasted butternut squash (Halve squash lengthwise, remove seeds and pulp, cut into pieces, toss with a tiny bit of olive oil, and roast approximately 20 minutes in a 450 degree oven, stirring after 10 minutes.  I find it easier to peel it when it is cool enough to handle, but you can peel it before roasting.)
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Optional garnish: sprigs of fresh rosemary

THE PESTO

  • 1 cup fairly firmly packed torn kale leaves, thick or tough stems removed
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1 large garlic clove
  • 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary leaves
  • 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast
  • Juice and zest of 1/2 of a medium lemon
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons maple syrup
  • Sea salt to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 /2 cup or more olive oil (up to about 3/4 cup or so)

Place kale in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until very finely chopped.  Add remaining ingredients, except olive oil, and pulse until kale is minced and walnuts are very finely chopped.  With motor running, drizzle in olive oil until desired consistency is reached.  Adjust seasoning, citrus and sweetness if necessary.

THE PASTA

In a large pot of boiling, generously salted water, cook pasta just until al dente, about 8 minutes.   Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, whisk together pesto and soy creamer.  If you want the sauce to be a little looser, whisk in olive oil, a tablespoon at t time, until desired consistency is reached.  When pasta is cooked, drain, return to pot, and place over medium heat.  Immediately add sauce and toss together quickly.  Then add butternut squash and toss gently again.  Check for seasoning and adjust as necessary with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.  Remove the pot from the heat and serve the pasta immediately topped with sprigs of rosemary if desired.

The Not So Innocent Spice?
NPR on nutmeg. Who wouldn’t be intrigued by that title? And a fun story to boot.. on colonial trading of spices and turf (Manhattan), nutmeg benders and more.

The Not So Innocent Spice?

NPR on nutmeg. Who wouldn’t be intrigued by that title? And a fun story to boot.. on colonial trading of spices and turf (Manhattan), nutmeg benders and more.

What's more efficient-cooking dried beans or buying canned?

After some gas bills have left us wondering whether it’d just be more efficient to cook canned beans, some googling yielded several cost comparisons that confirmed some of our ideas taht a crockpot, rather than our gas stove could help us continue using the tastier, healthier, lighter (IE less fossil fuel to transport), cheaper dried beans, without turning on the flame and turning up our gas bill.